Researchers Database

KUSUHASHI, Nao

    Graduate School of Science and Engineering Mathematics Physics and Earth Sciences Associate Professor
Last Updated :2020/11/10

Researcher Information

Research funding number

  • 70567479

J-Global ID

Research Areas

  • Natural sciences / Solid earth science / Geology
  • Natural sciences / Biogeoscience / Vertebrare Paleontology

Academic & Professional Experience

  • 2019/10 - Today  Ehime UniversityGraduate School of Science and EngineeringAssociate professor
  • 2009/06 - 2019/09  Ehime UniversityGraduate School of Science and EngineeringAssistant professor
  • 2006/06 - 2009/05  Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology & Paleoanthropology, Chinese Academy of SciencesPostdoctoral research fellow
  • 2006/04 - 2006/06  Kyoto UniversityGraduate School of ScienceTrainee

Education

  • 2001/04 - 2006/03  Kyoto University  Graduate School of Science  Ph.D. Course, Division of Earth & Planetary Sciences
  • 1999/04 - 2001/03  Kyoto University  Graduate School of Science  Master Course, Division of Earth & Planetary Sciences
  • 1995/04 - 1999/03  Kyoto University  Faculty of Science

Association Memberships

  • Japanese Society for Zooarchaeology   Anthropological Society of Nippon   Sedimentological Society of Japan   Palaeontological Society of Japan   Geological Society of Japan   Society of Vertebrate Paleontology   

Published Papers

  • Liping Dong, Ryoko Matsumoto, Nao Kusuhashi, Yuanqing Wang, Yuan Wang, Susan E. Evans
    Journal of Systematic Palaeontology 18 (15) 1223 - 1242 1477-2019 2020/08 [Peer-reviewed]
     Scientific journal
  • Kusuhashi, N, Wang, Y.-Q, Li, C.-K, Jin, X
    Vertebrata PalAsiatica 58 (1) 45 - 66 1000-3118 2020/01 [Peer-reviewed]
     Scientific journal
  • Nishioka, Y, Kusuhashi, N, Takai, M
    Mammalian Science 日本哺乳類学会 60 (2) 251 - 267 2020 [Peer-reviewed]
     Scientific journal
  • Kusuhashi, N, Wang, Y.-Q, Jin, X
    Journal of Mammalian Evolution 1573-7055 2019/08 [Peer-reviewed]
     Scientific journal
  • Nakata K, Kusuhashi, N, Saito, S, Ohfuji, H, Nara, M
    Journal of the Geological Society of Japan 125 (6) 447 - 452 0016-7630 2019/06 [Peer-reviewed]
     Scientific journal
  • Sakai Yusuke, Tsutsumi Yukiyasu, Kusuhashi Nao, Sonoda Teppei, Horie Kenji, Matsuoka Atsushi
    The Journal of the Geological Society of Japan 一般社団法人 日本地質学会 125 (3) 255 - 260 0016-7630 2019 [Peer-reviewed]
     Scientific journal 

    The Tetori Group in the Shiramine area (Ishikawa Prefecture, central Japan) is subdivided into the Gomijima, Kuwajima, Akaiwa, and Kitadani formations (from bottom to top). A variety of animal and plant fossils have been reported from the Kuwajima, Akaiwa, and Kitadani formations, but the depositional ages are still poorly constrained. We obtained the first reliable zircon U-Pb age from the Akaiwa Formation of the Tetori Group in the Shiramine area using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The dated sample was taken from the lower part of the Akaiwa Formation along the Osugidani River (Shiramine area), and its U-Pb age is 121.2±1.1 Ma (95% confidence interval).

  • Wang, Y.-Q, Kusuhashi, N, Jin, X, Li, C.-K, Setoguchi, T, Gao, C.-L, Liu, J.-Y
    Vertebrata PalAsiatica 56 (3) 180 - 192 2018/07 [Peer-reviewed]
     Scientific journal
  • Takai, M, Kusuhashi, N, Nishioka, Y, Thaung-Htike, Zin-Maung-Maung-Thein
    Kaseki (Fossils) (103) 5 - 20 0022-9202 2018/03 [Peer-reviewed]
     Scientific journal
  • Upper Triassic (Carnian) mollusks from the Suoi Bang Formation in Me area, Ninh Binh Province, northern Vietnam
    Komatsu, T, Shigeta, Y, Doan, H. D, Trinh, H. T, Nguyen, H. B, Nguyen, M. T, Kusuhashi, N, Tsuihiji, T, Maekawa, T, Legrand, J, Manabe, M
    Bulletin of the National Museum of Nature and Science, Series C 43 1 - 10 2017/12 [Peer-reviewed]
     Scientific journal
  • Nara, M, Kusuhashi, N, Okamoto, T, Imai, S
    Journal of the Geological Society of Japan 123 (7) 471 - 489 0016-7630 2017/07 [Peer-reviewed]
  • Romain Amiot, Delphine Angst, Serge Legendre, Eric Buffetaut, Francois Fourel, Jan Adolfssen, Aurore Andre, Ana Voica Bojar, Aurore Canoville, Abel Barral, Jean Goedert, Stanislaw Halas, Nao Kusuhashi, Ekaterina Pestchevitskaya, Kevin Rey, Aurelien Royer, Antonio Alamo Feitosa Saraiva, Berengere Savary-Sismondini, Jean-Luc Simeon, Alexandra Touzeau, Zhonghe Zhou, Christophe Lecuyer
    SCIENCE OF NATURE 104 (5-6) 47  0028-1042 2017/06 [Peer-reviewed]
     Scientific journal 
    Oxygen isotope compositions of bone phosphate (delta O-18(p)) were measured in broiler chickens reared in 21 farms worldwide characterized by contrasted latitudes and local climates. These sedentary birds were raised during an approximately 3 to 4-month period, and local precipitation was the ultimate source of their drinking water. This sampling strategy allowed the relationship to be determined between the bone phosphate delta O-18(p) values (from 9.8 to 22.5% V-SMOW) and the local rainfall delta O-18(w) values estimated from nearby IAEA/WMO stations (from -16.0 to -1.0% V-SMOW). Linear least square fitting of data provided the following isotopic fractionation equation: delta O-18(w) = 1.119 (+/- 0.040) delta O-18(p) - 24.222 (+/- 0.644); R-2 = 0.98. The delta O-18(p)-delta O-18(w) couples of five extant mallard ducks, a common buzzard, a European herring gull, a common ostrich, and a greater rhea fall within the predicted range of the equation, indicating that the relationship established for extant chickens can also be applied to birds of various ecologies and body masses. Applied to published oxygen isotope compositions of Miocene and Pliocene penguins from Peru, this new equation computes estimates of local seawater similar to those previously calculated. Applied to the basal bird Confuciusornis from the Early Cretaceous of Northeastern China, our equation gives a slightly higher delta O-18(w) value compared to the previously estimated one, possibly as a result of lower body temperature. These data indicate that caution should be exercised when the relationship estimated for modern birds is applied to their basal counterparts that likely had a metabolism intermediate between that of their theropod dinosaur ancestors and that of advanced ornithurines.
  • Kusuhashi, N, Nishimura, T, Ohfuji, H, Minakawa, T, Saito, S, Maeda, H
    Bulletin of the Hobetsu Museum (32) 43 - 58 2017/03
  • Nao Kusuhashi, Tadashi Suzuki, Kazuaki Terui, Atsushi Sato, Romain Amiot
    ISLAND ARC 25 (6) 403 - 409 1038-4871 2016/11 [Peer-reviewed]
     Scientific journal 
    A mammalian dentary discovered in the Coniacian Ashizawa Formation (Fukushima, northeastern Japan) is described. The specimen is a fragment of the horizontal ramus of a left edentulous dentary with five alveoli, the distal four of which are plugged with broken roots. Based on the morphologies of the dentary and the roots, it is considered to be of a therian mammal. This constitutes the first discovery of a Mesozoic mammal in northeastern Japan and highlights the potential for future mammal discoveries in the Cretaceous System in northeastern Japan, which will be significant for disclosure of the mammalian faunal evolution in East Asia during the Late Cretaceous.
  • Nao Kusuhashi, Yuan-Qing Wang, Chuan-Kui Li, Xun Jin
    HISTORICAL BIOLOGY 28 (1-2) 14 - 26 0891-2963 2016/02 [Peer-reviewed]
     Scientific journal 
    Two new gobiconodontid mammals, Gobiconodon tomidaisp. nov. and Gobiconodon haizhouensissp. nov., from the Lower Cretaceous (Aptian to Albian) Shahai and Fuxin Formations, respectively, in Liaoning Province, northeastern China, are described. Gobiconodon tomidaisp. nov. is a small-sized species of the genus characterised by the lower dental formula 2.1.2.5, a double-rooted p2, the molariform crown being mesiodistally longer than tall, and a distinct and almost continuous lingual cingulid on m2-m4. Gobiconodon haizhouensissp. nov. is of similar size to Gobiconodon tomidaisp. nov. and is characterised by the lower dental formula 2.1.3.5, the molariform crown being slightly taller than the mesiodistal length, and a well-developed and almost continuous lingual cingulid on m1-m3. The new materials indicate that the upper molariform count of most species of Gobiconodon is likely to be four, one less than the lower molariform count. Gobiconodon is the second mammalian genus common to the Jehol and Fuxin mammalian faunas.http://www.zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:608F5A43-AE4D-41CF-A2E4-1C9C6CFCA67C
  • Hiroshige Matsuoka, Nao Kusuhashi, Ian J. Corfe
    JOURNAL OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY 36 (4) e1112289  0272-4634 2016 [Peer-reviewed]
     Scientific journal 
    We describe tritylodontid remains from the Lower Cretaceous Kuwajima Formation (Tetori Group) in central Japan as representing a new genus, Montirictus kuwajimaensis, gen. et sp. nov. Montirictus is a medium-sized tritylodontid genus characterized by upper cheek teeth having the cusp formula 2-2-2 with subequal cusps, buccal and lingual cusps retaining a crescentic shape with both buccal and lingual ridges anteriorly, and 'V'-shaped buccolingual cross-sections of two anteroposterior grooves between the three cusp rows. Tentative dating of the Kuwajima Formation to the Barremian-Aptian makes it the stratigraphically youngest representative of a long-lived, globally distributed and abundant mammaliamorph lineage and extends the known geographic range of tritylodontids.
  • Jean Goedert, Romain Amiot, Larbi Boudad, Eric Buffetaut, Francois Fourel, Pascal Godefroit, Nao Kusuhashi, Varavudh Suteethorn, Haiyan Tong, Mahito Watabe, Christophe Lecuyer
    PALAIOS 31 (1) 10 - 19 0883-1351 2016/01 [Peer-reviewed]
     Scientific journal 
    Oxygen isotope compositions of tooth enamel increments in theropod dinosaurs are investigated as potential climate seasonality. Six teeth of large carnivorous theropods collected from four Cretaceous formations deposited under contrasted climates have been sampled. These teeth have been analyzed for the oxygen isotope compositions of their apatite phosphate (delta O-18(p)) through incremental sampling performed along the major growth axis. Significant fluctuations in oxygen isotope compositions along the growth axis of each tooth are observed and interpreted as reflecting seasonality in ingested local surface water delta O-18(w) values. Fluctuations in delta O-18(p) values of theropod teeth from the Aptian of Thailand and Cenomanian of Morocco vary similarly to meteoric water d delta O-18(mw) values occurring today in sub-tropical regions subjected to large seasonal amounts of precipitations. A dinosaur tooth recovered from the more inland and mid-latitude Nemegt Formation of Mongolia shows a seasonal pattern similar to present-day cold temperate and continental climate. Finally, the high latitude and coastal Kakanaut Formation (Russia) experienced strongly dampened seasonal variations, most likely due to the influence of warm Pacific oceanic currents. Such conditions occur today in high latitude regions submitted to marine influence. These results further highlight the potential of using the oxygen isotope compositions of large theropod teeth to reconstruct past seasonal variations of terrestrial climates. Increased knowledge of past seasonality may help to better understand the complex interactions between climate and the dynamics of land biodiversity in terms of ecological adaptations, biogeography and the evolutionary history of organisms.
  • Kusuhashi, N, Okamoto, T
    Kaseki (Fossils) (97) 23 - 37 0022-9202 2015/03 [Peer-reviewed]
  • Romain Amiot, Xu Wang, Zhonghe Zhou, Xiaolin Wang, Christophe Lecuyer, Eric Buffetaut, Frederic Fluteau, Zhongli Ding, Nao Kusuhashi, Jinyou Mo, Marc Philippe, Varavudh Suteethorn, Yuanqing Wang, Xing Xu
    JOURNAL OF ASIAN EARTH SCIENCES 98 358 - 370 1367-9120 2015/02 [Peer-reviewed]
     Scientific journal 
    During the cold Late Barremian-Early Albian interval, terrestrial environments in East Asia were populated by rich and diverse vertebrate faunas characterized by a strong provincialism. The latitudinal gradient of temperature and the existence of geographic barriers likely accounted for some aspects of this heterogeneous distribution of faunas. Other factors, however, such as local environmental conditions and interactions within vertebrate communities, which could have influenced their distribution, have not yet been fully identified and understood. Therefore, new and published oxygen and carbon isotope compositions of apatite from Chinese and Thai reptiles (dinosaurs, crocodilians and turtles) have been analyzed and interpreted in terms of ecology, local air temperature and precipitation amounts. Differences in carbon and oxygen isotope compositions between various groups of sympatric plant-eating dinosaurs (sauropods, ornithopods and ceratopsians) indicate food resources partitioning among them most likely to avoid competition. Mid-latitude environments, where the Jehol Biota flourished, were submitted to cool temperate climatic conditions with Mean Air Temperature (MAT) of 10 +/- 4 degrees C and Mean Annual Precipitations (MAP) of about 600 mm/yr compatible with the existence of forest environments. By contrast, sub-tropical regions, characterized by MAT of about 20-25 degrees C were either submitted to high amounts of seasonal precipitations (of about 1200 mm/yr in Thailand) or to significant aridity (MAP of about 400 mm/yr in South China). This difference in precipitation regime between Thailand and South China may be attributed to the occurrence of the Coastal Cordillera extending along the East margin of the South China block. These mountain ranges likely prevented humid air masses from the Pacific to penetrate some parts of South China, thus generating a "rain shadow effect". Mosaic environments characterizing East Asia during the Late Early Cretaceous may have acted as a cradle for the origination of advanced dinosaur taxa that subsequently radiated over Eurasia and North America during the Late Cretaceous. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Romain Amiot, Xu Wang, Zhonghe Zhou, Xiaolin Wang, Christophe Lecuyer, Eric Buffetaut, Frederic Fluteau, Zhongli Ding, Nao Kusuhashi, Jinyou Mo, Marc Philippe, Varavudh Suteethorn, Yuanqing Wang, Xing Xu
    JOURNAL OF ASIAN EARTH SCIENCES 98 358 - 370 1367-9120 2015/02 [Peer-reviewed]
     Scientific journal 
    During the cold Late Barremian-Early Albian interval, terrestrial environments in East Asia were populated by rich and diverse vertebrate faunas characterized by a strong provincialism. The latitudinal gradient of temperature and the existence of geographic barriers likely accounted for some aspects of this heterogeneous distribution of faunas. Other factors, however, such as local environmental conditions and interactions within vertebrate communities, which could have influenced their distribution, have not yet been fully identified and understood. Therefore, new and published oxygen and carbon isotope compositions of apatite from Chinese and Thai reptiles (dinosaurs, crocodilians and turtles) have been analyzed and interpreted in terms of ecology, local air temperature and precipitation amounts. Differences in carbon and oxygen isotope compositions between various groups of sympatric plant-eating dinosaurs (sauropods, ornithopods and ceratopsians) indicate food resources partitioning among them most likely to avoid competition. Mid-latitude environments, where the Jehol Biota flourished, were submitted to cool temperate climatic conditions with Mean Air Temperature (MAT) of 10 +/- 4 degrees C and Mean Annual Precipitations (MAP) of about 600 mm/yr compatible with the existence of forest environments. By contrast, sub-tropical regions, characterized by MAT of about 20-25 degrees C were either submitted to high amounts of seasonal precipitations (of about 1200 mm/yr in Thailand) or to significant aridity (MAP of about 400 mm/yr in South China). This difference in precipitation regime between Thailand and South China may be attributed to the occurrence of the Coastal Cordillera extending along the East margin of the South China block. These mountain ranges likely prevented humid air masses from the Pacific to penetrate some parts of South China, thus generating a "rain shadow effect". Mosaic environments characterizing East Asia during the Late Early Cretaceous may have acted as a cradle for the origination of advanced dinosaur taxa that subsequently radiated over Eurasia and North America during the Late Cretaceous. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Ochi, M, Mamiya, T, Kusuhashi, N
    Journal of the Geological Society of Japan 120 (5) 165 - 179 2014/05 [Peer-reviewed]
     Scientific journal
  • Yasuyuki Tsujino, Yasunari Shigeta, Haruyoshi Maeda, Toshifumi Komatsu, Nao Kusuhashi
    ISLAND ARC 22 (4) 549 - 561 1038-4871 2013/12 [Peer-reviewed]
     Scientific journal 
    Discovery of Sirenites senticosus (Dittmar) in the upper part of the Sabudani Formation of the Kurosegawa Belt, Kito area, Tokushima Prefecture, Japan, establishes a late Early Carnian age for this part of the stratigraphic unit. Because S.senticosus was mainly distributed in the Tethyan region, its occurrence provides evidence that Late Triassic ammonoids of Japan had strong affinities with those of the Tethyan faunas. This finding clearly differs from the biogeographic distribution of contemporary bivalves in the region, which are referred to as the Kochigatani bivalve faunas, and show strong affinities to faunas of the Boreal region.
  • Nao Kusuhashi, Yukiyasu Tsutsumi, Haruo Saegusa, Kenji Horie, Tadahiro Ikeda, Kazumi Yokoyama, Kazuyuki Shiraishi
    Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 280 (1759) 20130142  1471-2954 2013 [Peer-reviewed]
     Scientific journal 
    We here describe a new Early Cretaceous (early Albian) eutherian mammal, Sasayamamylos kawaii gen. et sp. nov., from the 'Lower Formation' of the Sasayama Group, Hyogo Prefecture, Japan. Sasayamamylos kawaii is characterized by a robust dentary, a distinct angle on the ventral margin of the dentary at the posterior end of the mandibular symphysis, a lower dental formula of 3-4: 1: 4: 3, a robust lower canine, a non-molariform lower ultimate premolar, and a secondarily reduced entoconid on the molars. To date, S. kawaii is the earliest known eutherian mammal possessing only four premolars, which demonstrates that the reduction in the premolar count in eutherians started in the late Early Cretaceous. The occurrence of S. kawaii implies that the relatively rapid diversification of eutherians in the mid-Cretaceous had already started by the early Albian. © 2013 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.
  • Romain Amiot, Xu Wang, Zhonghe Zhou, Xiaolin Wang, Eric Buffetaut, Christophe Lecuyer, Zhongli Ding, Frederic Fluteau, Tsuyoshi Hibino, Nao Kusuhashi, Jinyou Mo, Varavudh Suteethorn, Yuanqing Wang, Xing Xu, Fusong Zhang
    PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 108 (13) 5179 - 5183 0027-8424 2011/03 [Peer-reviewed]
     Scientific journal 
    Early Cretaceous vertebrate assemblages from East Asia and particularly the Jehol Biota of northeastern China flourished during a period of highly debated climatic history. While the unique characters of these continental faunas have been the subject of various speculations about their biogeographic history, little attention has been paid to their possible climatic causes. Here we address this question using the oxygen isotope composition of apatite phosphate (delta(18)O(p)) from various reptile remains recovered from China, Thailand, and Japan. delta(18)O(p) values indicate that cold terrestrial climates prevailed at least in this part of Asia during the Barremian-early Albian interval. Estimated mean air temperatures of about 10 +/- 4 degrees C at midlatitudes (similar to 42 degrees N) correspond to present day cool temperate climatic conditions. Such low temperatures are in agreement with previous reports of cold marine temperatures during this part of the Early Cretaceous, as well as with the widespread occurrence of the temperate fossil wood genus Xenoxylon and the absence of thermophilic reptiles such as crocodilians in northeastern China. The unique character of the Jehol Biota is thus not only the result of its evolutionary and biogeographical history but is also due to rather cold local climatic conditions linked to the paleolatitudinal position of northeastern China and global icehouse climates that prevailed during this part of the Early Cretaceous.
  • Romain Amiot, Nao Kusuhashi, Xing Xu, Yuanqing Wang
    JOURNAL OF ASIAN EARTH SCIENCES 39 (5) 347 - 358 1367-9120 2010/10 [Peer-reviewed]
     Scientific journal 
    Isolated dinosaur teeth recovered from seven localities near Fuxin (western Liaoning Province, northeastern China) are described. They come from sediments belonging to the Shahai and Fuxin formations, considered to be Aptian to Albian in age. Seven taxa have been recognized. They include the oviraptorosaur Incisivosaurus, dromaeosaurid theropods, Euhelopus-like sauropods, as well as indeterminate nodosaurid, ankylosaurid, iguanodontoid and basal neoceratopsian ornithischians. The Shahai and Fuxin dinosaur faunas show the persistence of some Jehol biota taxa such as the highly specialised Incisivosaurus, basal titanosauriform sauropods, basal neoceratopsians and some dromaeosaurids, and the addition of more derived iguanodontoids and ankylosaurians. The persistence of some dinosaurs of the Jehol Biota into the Shahai and Fuxin formations suggests a long term stability of Liaoning terrestrial environments during the Early Cretaceous. Despite sampling bias and the rather small sample that must be taken into account, teeth abundances show a significant compositional difference between the localities of the Shahai and Fuxin formations, neoceratopsian teeth representing one third of dinosaur tooth remains in the Shahai Formation whereas they are totally absent in the Fuxin Formation. Ankylosaur teeth, in contrast, represent 3% of total remains in the Shahai Formation, whereas they seem to be the only herbivorous dinosaurs in the Fuxin Formation with 40% of the total number of teeth (the rest being theropod dinosaur teeth). Although a difference in micro-environmental conditions between Shahai and Fuxin localities may at least partly explain such pattern, the unusual and unbalanced faunal composition of Fuxin localities remains enigmatic and will need further field collecting in order to be clarified. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Nao Kusuhashi, Yaoming Hu, Yuanqing Wang, Takeshi Setoguchi, Hiroshige Matsuoka
    JOURNAL OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY 30 (5) 1501 - 1514 0272-4634 2010 [Peer-reviewed]
     Scientific journal 
    Two eobaatarid multituberculates, Heishanobaatar triangulus gen. et sp. nov. and Eobaataridae gen. et sp. indet., and an ?albionbaatarid multituberculate, Kielanobaatar badaohaoensis gen. et sp. nov., from the Lower Cretaceous (Aptian to Albian) Shahai and Fuxin formations in Liaoning Province, northeastern China, are described. Heishanobaatar triangulus is a moderate-sized multituberculate characterized by lower jaw dental formula 1.0.3.2, slender lower incisor, single-rooted p2, triangular p3 in lateral view, p4 with eight serrations, m1 with cusp formula 2:2, and m2 with cusp formula 1 (coalesced):2. Kielanobaatar badaohaoensis is characterized by upper anterior premolars with relatively flat occlusal surfaces, roughly pentangular P1 in occlusal view, P1 and P2 with three cusp rows (cusp formulae 1:3:2), and P3 with four cusps (cusp formula 2:2). Together with already described three species of eobaatarids from the same localities, they demonstrate that there were quite diverse multituberculates in Asia in the late Early Cretaceous, and suggest that the mammalian fauna known from the Shahai and Fuxin formations probably show a transitional state from the mammalian fauna of the Yixian Formation to Late Cretaceous Asian faunas.
  • Nao Kusuhashi, Yaoming Hu, Yuanqing Wang, Takeshi Setoguchi, Hiroshige Matsuoka
    JOURNAL OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY 29 (4) 1264 - 1288 0272-4634 2009/12 [Peer-reviewed]
     Scientific journal 
    Two eobaatarid multituberculate genera including three species front the Lower Cretaceous (Aptian-Albian) Shahai and Fuxin formations in Liaoning Province, northeastern China are described here: Sinobaatar xiei sp. nov., S. fuxinensis sp. nov., and Liaobaatar changi gen. et sp. nov. Sinobaatar xiei is characterized by in I with cusp formula 3:2 (labial:lingual), P4 with cusp formula 2:4. blade-like P5 with three cusps anteroposteriorly arranged, M I with cusp formula 4:4, and M2 with cusp formula 3:4. P1 to P3 of S. xiei lack distinct posterior cingulum. Sinobaatar fuxinensis has a more distinct posterior cingulum on P1 to P3, and its M2 has cusp formula 3:3. Sinobaatar xiei is within the size range of most other eobaatarids, and S. fuxinensis is slightly larger than S. xiei. Liaobaatar changi is clearly larger than other eobaatarids. The ratio of p4 length and height of L. changi and S. xiei (L./S.) are 1.9 and 1.7, respectively. Liaobaatar changi is also characterized by nil with cusp formula 3:3. A specimen of S. fuxinensis indicates that tooth replacement in eobaatarids occurred in the typical backward sequence seen in Late Cretaceous-Tertiary multituberculates.
  • Nao Kusuhashi, Yaoming Hu, Yuanqing Wang, Satoshi Hirasawa, Hiroshige Matsuoka
    GEOBIOS 42 (6) 765 - 781 0016-6995 2009/11 [Peer-reviewed]
     Scientific journal 
    The first triconodontids from Asia have been discovered from the Lower Cretaceous (Aptian to Albian) Shahai and Fuxin formations in Liaoning Province, northeastern China: Meiconodon lii gen. and sp. nov. and M. setoguchii gen. and sp. nov. M. lii is characterized by molariform teeth with a developed cusp d, an m3 with taller cusp a, an m4 with three primary cusps of subequal height, the posteriorly decreasing transverse width of the m4, and a considerably reduced m5. M. seloguchii is slightly larger than M. lii, and characterized by a sharp labial cingulum on the m4, and a less developed cusp d on the molariform teeth than M. lii. The extensive interlocking system between molariforms, posteriorly recumbent primary molariform cusps, and their great degree of asymmetry in occlusal view with rounded labial faces and more angulate lingual faces in lateral view, indicate that Meiconodon belongs to the triconodontid subfamily Alticonodontinae. These new taxa are the first record of Triconodontidae from Asia, and of Alticonodontinae outside North America, suggesting the occurrence of mammalian faunal exchange between North America and Asia during or before the Aptian-Albian. (C) 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All fights reserved.
  • Nao Kusuhashi
    ACTA PALAEONTOLOGICA POLONICA 53 (3) 379 - 390 0567-7920 2008/09 [Peer-reviewed]
     Scientific journal 
    Hakusanobaatar matsuoi gen. et sp. nov. and Tedoribaatar reini gen. et sp. nov. are multituberculate mammals recovered from the Lower Cretaceous (Barremian to lower Aptian) Kuwajima Formation of the Tetori Group in the Shiramine district, Hakusan City, Ishikawa Prefecture, central Japan. Hakusanobaatar matsuoi is an eobaatarid multituberculate characterized by a P4 with cusp formula 3:5, and a P5 with cusp formula 2:6:?2. One of the specimens of H. matsuoi has the best preserved upper premolar series among known eobaatarid specimens. Based on the dentition of H. matsuoi, it is highly probable that the cimolodontan P4 is homologous with the "plagiaulacidan" P5. Tedoribaatar reini is also tentatively attributed to Eobaataridae, and shows a single-rooted p3 and loss of at least the permanent p2. On the basis of these apomorphic features, T reini is considered to be the "plagiaulacidan" multituberculate that is most closely related to cimolodontans.
  • Nao Kusuhashi, Naoki Ikegami, Hiroshige Matsuoka
    PALEONTOLOGICAL RESEARCH 12 (2) 199 - 203 1342-8144 2008/06 [Peer-reviewed]
     Scientific journal
  • Nao Kusuhashi, Ai Matsumoto, Masaki Murakami, Takahiro Tagami, Takafumi Hirata, Tsuyoshi Iizuka, Takeshi Handa, Hiroshige Matsuoka
    ISLAND ARC 15 (3) 378 - 390 1038-4871 2006/09 [Peer-reviewed]
     Scientific journal 
    The upper Mesozoic Tetori Group contains numerous fossils of plants and marine and non-marine animals. The group has the potential to provide key information to improve our understanding of the Middle Jurassic to Early Cretaceous biota of East Asia. However, the depositional age of the Tetori Group remains uncertain, and without good age constraints, accurate correlation with other areas is very difficult. As a first step in obtaining reliable ages for the formations within the Tetori Group, we used laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to measure the U-Pb ages of zircons collected from tuff beds in the Shokawa district, Takayama City, Gifu Prefecture, central Japan. The youngest reliable U-Pb ages from the tuff beds of the Ushimaru, Mitarai and Okurodani Formations are 130.2 +/- 1.7, 129.8 +/- 1.0 and 117.5 +/- 0.7 Ma, respectively (errors represent 2 SE). These results indicate that the entire Tetori Group in the Shokawa district, which was previously believed to be correlated to the Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous, is in fact correlated to the Lower Cretaceous. The maximum ages of the Ushimaru, Mitarai and Okurodani Formations are late Hauterivian to Barremian, late Hauterivian to Barremian and Barremian to Aptian, respectively.
  • H Kamiya, T Yoshida, N Kusuhashi, H Matsuoka
    MATERIALS SCIENCE & ENGINEERING C-BIOMIMETIC AND SUPRAMOLECULAR SYSTEMS 26 (4) 707 - 709 0928-4931 2006/05 [Peer-reviewed]
     Scientific journal 
    Fossil teeth of the early Cretaceous mammal-like reptile (Tritylodontidae) were observed in the internal texture in relation to tooth development and evolution. The materials were discovered from the Tetori Group which is distributed in the western area of the central mountains of Japan, and these materials are the first mammal-like reptile discovered from the Cretaceous strata in the world. The authors investigated these fossil teeth of Tritylodontidae which is considered as most evolved mammal-like reptile in their microstructure, and found the characteristic texture of the enamel which is similar to the enamel prism which is common in the enamel of the modern mammals. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • KUSUHASHI Nao, YAMAJI Atsushi
    The Journal of the Geological Society of Japan 日本地質学会 107 (1) 26 - 40 0016-7630 2001/01 [Peer-reviewed]

Conference Activities & Talks

  • Stratigraphy of the Eocene Hiwadatoge Formation, Ehime, SW Japan  [Not invited]
    Kusuhashi, N, Ando, Y, Matsubara, T, Nara, M, Kurita, H, Yamaji, A
    124th Annual Meeting of the Geological Society of Japan  2017/09
  • Reinvestigation of an Early Cretaceous eutherian mammal Endotherium niinomii  [Not invited]
    Kusuhashi, N, Wang, Y.-Q, d Li, C.-K
    4th International Symposium of the IGCP 608, Cretaceous Ecosystems and Their Responses to Paleoenvironmental Changes in Asia and the Western Pacific  2016/08
  • Reinvestigation of an Early Cretaceous eutherian mammal Endotherium niinomii  [Not invited]
    Kusuhashi, N, Wang, Y.-Q, d Li, C.-K
    165th Regular Meeting of the Palaeontological Society of Japan  2016/01
  • Early Cretaceous "triconodont" mammals from the Kuwajima Formation (Tetori Group), Ishikawa, central Japan  [Not invited]
    KUSUHASHI Nao
    12th Symposium on Mesozoic Terrestrial Ecosystems  2015/08
  • A mammal jaw from the Upper Cretaceous Ashizawa Formation (Futaba Group), Fukushima, northeastern Japan  [Not invited]
    Kusuhashi, N, Suzuki, T, Terui, K, Sato, A, Amiot, R
    2nd International Symposium of the IGCP 608, Cretaceous Ecosystems and Their Responses to Paleoenvironmental Changes in Asia and the Western Pacific  2014/09
  • Early Cretaceous mammlian fossil assemblage from the Shahai and Fuxin formations, Liaoning, China  [Not invited]
    Kusuhashi, N, Wang, Y
    162nd Regular Meeting of the Palaeontological Society of Japan  2013/01
  • A new Early Cretaceous eutherian mammal from the “Lower Formation” of the Sasayama Group, Sasayama, Hyogo, Japan  [Not invited]
    Kusuhashi, N, Saegusa, H, Ikeda, T, Tanaka, S
    6th International Symposium of the IGCP 507, Paleoclimates of the Cretaceous in Asia and Their Global Correlation  2011/08
  • Early Cretaceous eutherian fossils from the "Lower Formation" of the Sasayama Group, Sasayama, Hyogo, Japan  [Not invited]
    Kusuhashi, N, Saegusa, H, Ikeda, T, Tanaka, S
    160th Regular Meeting of the Palaeontological Society of Japan  2011/01
  • Early Cretaceous “triconodonts” from the Kuwajima Formation (Tetori Group), Hakusan, Ishikawa, central Japan  [Not invited]
    Kusuhashi, N, Tsubamoto, T
    2010 Annual Meeting of the Palaeontological Society of Japan  2010/06
  • Early Cretaceous multituberculate and "triconodont" mammals from East Asia: their paleobiogeographical implications  [Not invited]
    Kusuhashi, N, Hu, Y.-M, Wang, Y.-Q, Hirasawa, S, Tsubamoto, T
    4th International Symposium of the IGCP 507, Paleoclimates of the Cretaceous in Asia and Their Global Correlation  2009/12
  • Early Cretaceous eutriconodontans from the Fuxin district, Liaoning, China  [Not invited]
    Kusuhashi, N, Hu, Y.-M, Wang, Y.-Q, Hirasawa, S
    11th Annual Meeting of the Chinese Society for Vertebrate Paleontology  2008/09
  • Early Cretaceous eutriconodontans and multituberculates (Mammalia) from the Shahai and Fuxin formations, northeastern China  [Not invited]
    Kusuhashi, N, Hu, Y.-M, Wang, Y.-Q
    Mid-Mesozoic Life and Environments  2008/06
  • Early Cretaceous eutriconodontans from the Fuxin district, Liaoning, China  [Not invited]
    Kusuhashi, N, Hirasawa, S, Hu, Y.-M, Wang, Y.-Q
    2007 Annual Meeting of the Palaeontological Society of Japan  2007/06
  • Early Cretaceous multituberculate mammals from the Fuxin district, Liaoning Province, China  [Not invited]
    Kusuhashi, N, Hu, Y.-M, Wang, Y.-Q
    156th Regular Meeting of the Palaeontological Society of Japan  2007/02
  • Early Cretaceous multituberculate mammals from the Fuxin district, Liaoning Province, China  [Not invited]
    Kusuhashi, N, Hu, Y.-M, Wang, Y.-Q
    10th Annual Meeting of the Chinese Society for Vertebrate Paleontology  2006/11
  • Multituberculate mammals from the Lower Cretaceous Kuwajima Formation (Tetori Group) in the Shiramine district, Ishikawa Prefecture, central Japan, and biogeographical transition of Mesozoic multituberculates  [Not invited]
    Kusuhashi, N
    155th Regular Meeting of the Palaeontological Society of Japan  2006/02
  • Multituberculate mammals from the upper Lower Cretaceous Fuxin Formation, northeastern China  [Not invited]
    Kusuhashi, N
    IX International Mammalogical Congress  2005/08
  • A eutherian lower molar collected from the Upper Cretaceous Mifune Group in Kumamoto Prefecture, Japan  [Not invited]
    Kusuhashi, N, Ikegami, N, Matsuoka, H
    2002 Annual Meeting of the Palaeontological Society of Japan  2002/06

MISC

  • Murakami, M, Kusuhashi, N, Yasui, K  Science Report of the Toyohashi Museum of Natural History  (28)  27  -36  2018/03
  • Kusuhashi, N, Murakami, M, Yasui, K  Science Report of the Toyohashi Museum of Natural History  (28)  37  -45  2018/03
  • 北部ベトナムニンビン省メ地域のソイバン層より産出した上部三畳系カーニアン階の軟体動物化石
    小松俊文, 重田康成, Doan D. Hung, Trinh, T. Ha・Nguyen, B. Hung, Nguyen, T. Minh, 楠橋 直, 對比地孝亘, 前川 匠・Legrand Julien, 真鍋 真  国立科学博物館研究報告 C類(地質学・古生物学)  43-  1  -10  2017/12
  • The first record of the trace fossil Scoyenia gracilis White from Cretaceous non-marine deposits of northwest Vietnam
    Nara, M, Komatsu, T, Kusuhashi, N, Tsuihiji, T, Manabe, M, Nguyen, H. H, Doan, H. D, Nguyen, H. B, Nguyen, M. T  Proceedings of the 2nd National Scientific Conference of Vietnam Natural Museum System  216  -222  2016/03
  • Japanese oldest mammalian fossils from the Lower Cretaceous Kuwajima Formation
    Kusuhashi, N, Tsubamoto, T  Research Report on Fossils from the Kuwajima Kaseki-kabe Site  43  -48  2010
  • Early Cretaceous tritylodontid fossils from the Kuwajima Formation
    Matsuoka, H, Kusuhashi, N  Research Report on Fossils from the Kuwajima Kaseki-kabe Site  37  -42  2010
  • A Pompeii-style event experienced by Early Cretaceous limuloids: a note on the Kouphichnium ichnofossil locality of the Lower Cretaceous Tetori Group in Setono, Hakusan City, Japan
    Matsuoka, H, Hirasawa, S, Inglis, M, Terashima, Y, Kusuhashi, N, Hasegawa, Y  Journal of Fossil Research  41-  62  -75  2009
  • Haruo Saegusa, Tadahiro Ikeda, Nao Kusuhashi, Satoshi Tanaka, Takashi Matsubara  JOURNAL OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY  28-  (3)  135A  -135A  2008/09  Summary international conference
  • Myology and osteology of the whooper swan Cygnus cygnus (Aves: Anatidae), Part 2: Muscles of the jaws, tongue and anteriormost neck
    Matsuoka, H, Kurosu, H, Inglis, M.P, Kitagawa, H, Kusuhashi, N, Hasegawa, Y  Bulletin of Gunma Museum of Natural History  12-  1  -14  2008
  • Stratigraphy of the late Mesozoic Tetori Group in the Hakusan Region, central Japan: an overview
    Kusuhashi, N, Matsuoka, H, Kamiya, H, Setoguchi, T  Memoirs of the Faculty of Science, Kyoto University, Series of Geology and Mineralogy  59-  9  -31  2002
  • A clue to the Neocomian vertebrate fauna: initial results from the Kuwajima "Kaseki-kabe" (Tetori Group) in Shiramine, Ishikawa, central Japan
    Matsuoka, H, Kusuhashi, N, Takada, T, Setoguchi, T  Memoirs of the Faculty of Science, Kyoto University, Series of Geology and Mineralogy  59-  33  -45  2002

Research Grants & Projects

  • Mammalian faunal transition in Asia during the Early Cretaceous: The rise of eutherians and the establishment of the 'Late Cretaceous-type' fauna
    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science:Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C)
    Date (from‐to) : 2020/04 -2025/03 
    Author : Nao Kusuhashi
  • Japan Society for the Promotion of Science:Grant-in-Aid for Encouragement of Young Scientists (B)
    Date (from‐to) : 2016 -2019 
    Author : KUSUHASHI Nao
  • Japan Society for the Promotion of Science:Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B)
    Date (from‐to) : 2014 -2017 
    Author : TAKAI Masanaru
  • Dynamique de la biodiversité et climats terrestres au Crétacé inférieur d'Asie de l'Est
    Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique:Projet International de Coopération Scientifique
    Date (from‐to) : 2012 -2014 
    Author : Romain AMIOT
  • Japan Society for the Promotion of Science:Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists (B)
    Date (from‐to) : 2012 -2014 
    Author : Nao KUSUHASHI
  • Fundamental study on paleobiogeography of Early Cretaceous mammals
    Ehime University:Grant-in-Aid for Research Promotion
    Date (from‐to) : 2010 -2011 
    Author : KUSUHASHI Nao
  • Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology:Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B)
    Date (from‐to) : 2008 -2010 
    Author : Haruo SAEGUSA, 小林 文夫, 松原 尚志, 田中 里志, 池田 忠広, 楠橋 直, 小林 文夫, 松原 尚志, 渡部 真人, 大橋 智之
     
    A rich vertebrate fossil assemblage was found from the Lower Cretaceous Sasayama Group in Tamba and Sasayama Cities of Hyogo Prefecture, SW Japan. The Sasayama Group consists of fluvial sediments deposited under a climate characterized by distinct dry and wet seasons. The vertebrate fossils have been excavated from the flood plain deposits of "the lower formation" of the Group. The flood plain deposits of the formation have yielded dinosaur remains representing seven dinosaur taxa including a partial skeleton of a basal titanosauriform, numerous skeletal remains of frogs including complete ...
  • Study on Early Cretaceous mammals from Fuxin, Liaoning Province
    Chinese Academy of Sciences:Research Fellowship for International Young Researchers
    Date (from‐to) : 2007 -2009 
    Author : KUSUHASHI Nao
  • Mammalian fossil assemblage from the Lower Cretaceous part of the Tetori Group
    Fujiwara Natural History Foundation:Grants-in-Aid of Fujiwara Natural History Foundation
    Date (from‐to) : 2008 -2008 
    Author : TSUBAMOTO Takehisa

Teaching Experience

  • Advanced Earth SciencesAdvanced Earth Sciences Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University

愛媛大学教員活動実績

教育活動(B)

担当授業科目(B01)

  • 2019, the first semester, under graduate, 地球科学野外実習Ⅰ
  • 2019, the first semester, under graduate, 地質調査法実習
  • 2019, the first semester, under graduate, 地球科学野外研究
  • 2019, the first semester, under graduate, 基礎地学実験
  • 2019, the first semester, under graduate, 基礎地学実験
  • 2019, the first semester, master course, 地質学特論
  • 2019, the first semester, master course, 地球科学フィールド高等実習Ⅰ
  • 2019, the first semester, master course, 地球科学フィールド高等実習Ⅲ
  • 2019, the first semester, master course, 地球科学プレゼンテーション特別実習Ⅰ
  • 2019, the first semester, master course, 地球科学プレゼンテーション特別実習Ⅲ
  • 2019, the first semester, master course, 地球科学ゼミナールⅠ
  • 2019, the first semester, master course, 地球科学ゼミナールⅢ
  • 2019, the first semester, master course, 地球科学プレゼンテーション特別実習Ⅱ
  • 2019, the first semester, master course, 地球科学フィールド高等実習Ⅱ
  • 2019, the first semester, master course, 地球科学高等実験Ⅲ
  • 2019, the first semester, under graduate, 基礎地学実験
  • 2019, the first semester, under graduate, 地球科学野外実習I
  • 2019, the first semester, under graduate, 地質調査法実習
  • 2019, the first semester, under graduate, 地球科学野外研究


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